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Thread: Formating integers into money

  1. #1

    Default Formating integers into money

    having the following fields for my money class.
    import java.text.DecimalFormat;
    public class Money 
    {
    		//Fields for money will hold dollars and cents
    	private long dollars;
    	private long cents;

    My task is to use those fields and make a toString method that returns them like a dollars sign. For instance, if there are 32 dollars and 40 cents, then in my String method I have to return something similar to this "$32.40."

    I have already tried some of the methods, but they don't seem to work fine.
    public String toString()
    	{
    		DecimalFormat formatter=new DecimalFormat("$#0");
    		DecimalFormat formatCents=new DecimalFormat(".00");
    		return formatter.format(dollars)+ formatCents.format(cents);
    	}

    Anyone willing to lend an idea?

    --- Update ---

     import java.text.DecimalFormat;
    public class Money 
    {
    		//Fields for money will hold dollars and cents
    	private long dollars;
    	private long cents;
     
    	//Create a constructor initlizing the fields
    	public Money(double money)
    	{
    		if(money<0)
    			System.out.print("Negative Amount cannot be accepted");
    		else
    		{
    		long total_cents=(long)money*100;
    		dollars=total_cents/100;
    		cents=total_cents%100;
    		}
    	}
    	//Return a toString method that returns a string
    	public String toString()
    	{
    		DecimalFormat formatter=new DecimalFormat("$#00.00");
    		long total_Cents=(dollars*100)+cents;
    		return formatter.format(total_Cents);
    	}

    Actually changed a little on my code and I believe strongly this should work; however, doesn't seem to. In my demo,
    public class Dem
    {
     
     
    	public static void main(String[] args) 
    	{
    		Money myMoney=new Money(7.10);
    		System.out.print(myMoney.toString());
     
    	}
     
    }
    I pass this, but I get "$700.00" as the answer... confused...

    --- Update ---

    nevermind, my calculation is wrong in the toString method, but still the cents do not appear to be showing.


  2. #2
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    Default Re: Formating integers into money

    you have a little problem with this statement in your constructor
    long total_cents=(long)money*100;
    dollars=total_cents/100;
    cents=total_cents%100;


    Here's another way.
    let say I'll pass 7.45 (as double primitive type)
    First, I'll get the dollar which is 7
    I'll just equate it to int or long primitive type. that way, I'll get rid of .45
    ex:
    int dollar = (int) 7.45; or
    long dollar = (long) 7.45;
    that way, variable dollar is equal to 7

    next I'll get the modulo of 7.45 in 1. that way, I can get the decimal place of the number
    int cent = 7.45 % 1; or
    long cent = 7.45 % 1;
    that way, the value of cent equal to 45. you just need to format it in some case, in this case the modulo is 4500...02.

    then return it
    return "$" + dollar + " cent" + cent;

    of course there is still another way of doing that.

    --- Update ---

    long total_cents=(long)money*100; -- casting it to long first (7.10 becomes 7) then multiply it to 100 (becomes 700)
    dollars=total_cents/100; -- 700 divided by 100 is 7 (just getting the dollar value).
    cents=total_cents%100; -- you are just getting the remainder of the dollar when divided by 100.

    you can do this
    long total_cents=(long) (money*100); -- as you noticed, I put parenthesis in the multiplication so it means to multiply first before casting to long

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